Navigation – Plan du site
Comptes rendus d'articles

Comptes rendus d'articles

Articles review
p. 137-149

Plan

Haut de page

Texte intégral

Françoise Ardillier-Carras, « Sud Caucase : conflit du Karabagh et nettoyage ethnique »

Françoise Ardillier-Carras, « Sud Caucase : conflit du Karabagh et nettoyage ethnique », Bulletin de l’Association de Géographes Français, 2006, 83ème année, n° 4, pp. 409-432

1Avec l’effondrement de l’URSS, la manifestation de tensions interethniques, héritages des politiques staliniennes, engendre des conflits et constitue une des principales causes de revendications territoriales. Dans le sud du Caucase, la situation du Haut-Karabagh agit comme un détonateur, entraînant un affrontement armé (1990-1994) entre Arméniens et Azéris et conduit à un nettoyage ethnique radical sur fond de nationalismes exacerbés. Enjeu sécuritaire pour l’Arménie, atteinte à l’intégrité territoriale pour l’Azerbaïdjan, les effets de la guerre du Karabagh sur l’organisation sociale et spatiale de la région expriment de graves incertitudes géopolitiques dans une zone tiraillée par les intérêts des grandes puissances.

Arnstein Aassve, Francesco C. Billari and Zsolt Spéder, “Societal Transition, policy Changes and Family Formation: Evidence from Hungary”

Arnstein Aassve, Francesco C. Billari and Zsolt Spéder, “Societal Transition, policy Changes and Family Formation: Evidence from Hungary”, European Journal of Demography, 2006, vol. 22, n° 2, pp. 127-152.

2This paper uses the Hungarian Generations and Gender Survey ‘Turning Points in the Life Course’ (HGGS) to describe recent changes in union formation, onset of childbearing, leaving home and cohabitation. By estimating survivor functions and semi-parametric hazard regression models with time-varying covariates for the timing of first union and first birth, the authors find a long delay among the youngest cohorts, but also remarkably strong period effects. Reduced employment, increased educational enrolment, and a higher level of uncertainty are important drivers behind these changes. Moreover, their evidence suggests that certain policy changes during the transition have exacerbated this effect, having an asymmetric impact on family formation – depending on the social status of individuals.

Kenneth A. Bollen, , Jennifer L. Glanville and Guy Stecklov, “Socio-Economic Status, Permanent Income, and Fertility: A Latent-Variable Approach”

Kenneth A. Bollen, , Jennifer L. Glanville and Guy Stecklov, “Socio-Economic Status, Permanent Income, and Fertility: A Latent-Variable Approach”, Population Studies, 2007, vol. 61, n° 1, pp. 15-34

3This paper examines how permanent income and other components of socio-economic status (SES) are related to fertility in less developed countries. Because permanent income cannot be measured directly, the authors employ a latent-variable method. They compare their results with those of the more common proxy-variable method and investigate the consequences of not accounting for measurement error. Using data from Ghana and Peru, they find that permanent income has a large, negative influence on fertility and that research must take the latent nature of permanent income into account to uncover its influence. Controlling for measurement error in the proxies for permanent income can also lead to substantial changes in the estimated effects of control variables. Finally, they examine which of the common proxies for permanent income most closely capture the concept. The results have implications beyond this specific dependent variable, providing evidence on the sensitivity of microanalyses to the treatment of long-term economic status.

John Bongaarts, “Late Marriage and the HIV Epidemic in the Sub-Saharan Africa”

John Bongaarts, “Late Marriage and the HIV Epidemic in the Sub-Saharan Africa”, Population Studies, 2007, vol. 61, n° 1, pp 73-83

4The causes of large variation in the sizes of HIV epidemics among countries in sub-Saharan Africa are not well understood. Here the author assesses the potential role of late age at marriage and a long period of premarital sexual activity as population risk factors, using ecological data from 33 sub-Saharan African countries and with individual-level data from Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) in Kenya and Ghana in 2003. The ecological analysis finds a significant positive correlation between HIV prevalence and median age at first marriage, and between HIV prevalence and interval between first sexual intercourse and first marriage. The individual-level analysis shows that HIV infection per year of exposure is higher before than after first marriage. These findings support the hypothesis of a link between a high average age at marriage and a long period of premarital intercourse during which partner changes are relatively common and facilitate the spread of HIV.

Michel Bruneau, « Les territoires de l’identité et la mémoire collective en diaspora »

Michel Bruneau, « Les territoires de l’identité et la mémoire collective en diaspora », L’Espace Géographique, 2006, tome 3, n° 4, pp. 328-333

5Une population en diaspora cherche à s’approprier des lieux dans ses territoires d’installation ou d’accueil en se référant à la mémoire collective de ses lieux d’origine ou « patries perdues », ainsi qu’à celles d’événements ayant joué pour elle un rôle fondateur. Elle utilise une « iconographie », support de cette mémoire et de son identité, comme marqueur de sa territorialité. L’exemple des réfugiés grecs d’Asie Mineure est privilégié dans cet article.

Tim Butler and Loretta Lees, “Super-Gentrification in Barnsbury, London: Globalization and Gentrifying Global Elites at the Neighbourhood Level”

Tim Butler and Loretta Lees, “Super-Gentrification in Barnsbury, London: Globalization and Gentrifying Global Elites at the Neighbourhood Level”, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 2006, vol. 31, n° 4, pp. 467-487

6In this paper the authors argue that a process of super-gentrification is occurring in the already gentrified, inner London neighbourhood of Barnsbury. A new group of super wealthy professionals working in the City of London is slowly imposing its mark on this inner London housing market in a way that differentiates it and them both from traditional gentrifiers and from the traditional urban upper classes. The authors suggest that there is a close interaction between work in the newly globalizing industries of the financial services economy, elite forms of education, particularly Oxbridge, and residence in Barnsbury which is very different from other areas of gentrified inner London.

Samuel Nii Ardey Codjoe, “Varying Effect of Fertility Determinants among Migrant and Indigenous Females in the Transitional Agro-Ecological Zone of Ghana”

Samuel Nii Ardey Codjoe, “Varying Effect of Fertility Determinants among Migrant and Indigenous Females in the Transitional Agro-Ecological Zone of Ghana”, Geografiska Annaler Series B Human Geography, 2007, vol. 89B, n° 1, pp. 23-37

7The transitional agro-ecological zone of Ghana located between the richly endowed south and the impoverished north, has attracted seasonal and permanent farm migrants, mainly from northern Ghana, who now live side by side with the indigenous people. While migrants have higher numbers of Muslims, indigenous people are mainly Christians. Although the majority of the migrants live in migrant quarters with less favourable socio-economic conditions, they are more successful farmers and therefore wealthier. The objectives are to examine the varying effect of fertility determinants among migrant and indigenous females. This paper uses data collected in 2002 among 194 females aged 15 to 49 years. Multiple regression models are used to assess fertility determinants. Results show that although migrant households wealthier, migrant females were more traditional. They had more children living in fostercare, and a lower proportion of them approved of men participating in household activities. In addition, they were less well educated, recorded higher infant mortality, gave birth earlier and used less contraception. Furthermore, while a female’s migration status is statistically significant so far as non-proximate determinants of fertility are concerned, the same variable is not significant with respect to proximate determinants. In addition, a married female migrant would on average have almost one more child compared to her indigenous counterpart, and migrant females who had experienced the loss of a child would on average have 2.5 more children compared to their indigenous counterparts. Finally, more affluent migrant females have 0.08 fewer children compared to their indigenous counterpart.

Ram B. Bhagat, “Census and Caste Enumeration: British Legacy and Contemporary Practice in India”

Ram B. Bhagat, “Census and Caste Enumeration: British Legacy and Contemporary Practice in India”, Genus, 2006 (April-June), vol. LXII, n° 2, pp. 119-134

8Caste is an important identity for the majority of Indian people. However, caste enumeration was discontinued after independence except for those castes and tribes notified by the President of India, which are known as Scheduled Tribes in order to provide them with special benefits. Recently, the Government of India has also extended these special benefits to Other Backward Classes (OBCs), identified using information from the 1931 census, which led to a strong plea to include caste on the eve of the 2001 census. But this did not find favour with the Government. The paper attempts to examine the changing practices of caste enumeration and their categorisation in censuses and to demonstrate that the dilemma of including caste in the 2001 census is embedded in the British legacy.

Joan Costa-Font and Ana Rico, “Devolution and the Interregional Inequalities in Health and Healthcare in Spain”

Joan Costa-Font and Ana Rico, “Devolution and the Interregional Inequalities in Health and Healthcare in Spain”, Regional Studies, 2006 (November), vol. 40, n° 8, pp. 875-887

9The desirability and devolution of government responsibilities is often questioned on the grounds of regional cohesion concerns. This feature is especially relevant in welfare policy areas such as healthcare services given their impact on an individual’s well-being. This paper examines the effects of health system devolution on the emergence of inter-territorial inequalities in healthcare outcomes (mortality) and outputs (healthcare expenditure) in the Spanish National Health System (NHS). Based on an empirical model for regional health expenditure, and drawing from a battery of inequality indicators (some taken from previous studies, other estimated anew), the following results are obtained. First, healthcare devolution hat not led to an expansion of regional inequalities in healthcare outcomes and outputs. Second, there is no clear-cut evidence that devolution increases public health expenditure (in real terms) in developed region-states, with the exception of fiscally accountable autonomous communities. Finally, regional health expenditure is explained by differences in need and higher reliance healthcare inputs use, size effects as well as the region-specific economic and demographic dimension in addition to regional income.

Josette Debroux, « Migration d’actifs vers l’espace “rural isolé”. Éléments d’analyse sur les liens à l’espace d’arrivée »

Josette Debroux, « Migration d’actifs vers l’espace “rural isolé”. Éléments d’analyse sur les liens à l’espace d’arrivée », Norois, 2006 (3), n° 200, pp. 79-89

10Cet article a pour but de montrer que les choix de localisation dans l’espace « rural isolé » (sens Insee), des migrants actifs, renvoient à l’activation de liens situés dans cet « espace de référence” ou “ espace fondateur” pour certains ; il peut, pour d’autres correspondre à l’inscription d’un lien plus récent. S’il existe une correspondance entre investissement local et types de liens à l’espace, c’est surtout la manière dont est envisagée la migration, dépendante des propriétés sociales du migrant, qui permet de comprendre les variations d’investissement dans la vie locale.

Irma T. Elo, Pekka Martikainen, Kirsten P. Smith,“Socioeconomic Differentials in Mortality in Finland and the United States: The Role of Education and Income”, Journal of Demography, 2006, vol. 22, n° 2, pp. 179-203

11The authors document social inequalities in cause-specific mortality at ages 35-64 in Finland and the United States, countries with different health systems, income distributions, and social welfare programs for the working-aged population. The education-mortality gradient was the most marked for Finnish men and for causes of death linked to risk-taking, health behaviors, and stress. The association between family income and mortality was curvilinear in both countries. The effects of education and income were strongly attenuated after controlling for each other, marital status, and labor force participation, with the greatest attenuation observed for income in Finland and education in the United States.

Javier Ferri, Antonio G. Gómez-Plana, Joan A. Martin-Montaner, “Illegal Immigration Booms and Welfare in the Host Country”

Javier Ferri, Antonio G. Gómez-Plana, Joan A. Martin-Montaner, “Illegal Immigration Booms and Welfare in the Host Country”, European Journal of Population, 2006, vol. 22, n° 4, pp. 353-370

12The authors assess the effects of an important influx of illegal immigration on production and welfare, applied to the Spanish economy during the nineties, through a calibrated general equilibrium model. Immigrants are perfect substitutes of unskilled native workers, according to their productivity, but they are unevenly rewarded. In a first simulation the authors analyse the effects of an exogenous increase of illegal workers equal to the estimates for the period. In an other simulation an equivalent expansion in unskilled legal immigrants is then considered. Finally, a comparison of both simulations provides the scenario of illegal immigrants being legalised. The outcome suggests that the amount of remittances and the role of labour marked mechanisms (e.g. trade unions) play an important role in overall results.

Patrick Festy, « La légalisation des couples homosexuels en Europe »

Patrick Festy, « La légalisation des couples homosexuels en Europe », Population, 2006, vol. 61, n° 4, pp. 493-531

13De 1989 à 2003, neuf pays européens (Danemark, Finlande, Islande, Norvège et Suède, Pays-Bas, Allemagne, Belgique et France) ont ouvert aux couples homosexuels la possibilité de faire enregistrer leur union devant un représentant de l’État et de contracter ainsi des droits et devoirs légaux. Pour déterminer la fréquence du recours à ces formes de législation alternatives au mariage, les outils classiques de mesure doivent être adaptés à une réalité nouvelle qui met en avant des catégories qu’on avait l’habitude de négliger. La législation de unions de couples homosexuels est sensiblement moins fréquente que celle des couples hétérosexuels par le mariage malgré la désaffection qui touche l’institution matrimoniale. Sans doute les lois nouvelles sont-elles jugées tout à la fois trop en deçà des lois sur le mariage pour être attrayantes et trop proches d’elles pour être adaptées à la spécificité des couples qu’elles visent. Par ailleurs, la fréquence des enregistrements dans les différents pays est disparate, bien davantage que ne l’est le recours au mariage. Cependant, les pays qui ont accordé le plus de droits aux couples enregistrés ne sont pas toujours ceux où le recours à la loi est le plus élevé. Enfin, les lois ont été adoptées dans un contexte général de désaffection à l’égard du mariage et de remise en cause des formes familiales classiques. D’où l’hypothèse d’une possible influence de cet environnement sur l’attitude des couples concernés à l’égard des nouvelles législations.

Joëlle Gaymu, Christiane Delbès, Sabine Springer, Adrian Binet, Aline Désesquelles, Stamatis Kalogirou, Uta Ziegler, “Determinants of the Living Arrangements of Older People in Europe”

Joëlle Gaymu, Christiane Delbès, Sabine Springer, Adrian Binet, Aline Désesquelles, Stamatis Kalogirou, Uta Ziegler, “Determinants of the Living Arrangements of Older People in Europe”, European Journal of Population, 2006, vol. 22, n° 3, pp. 241-262

14This paper analyses the influence of relevant variables (age, sex, marital status, health, income education and children) on the risk on belonging to one of the four main types of household in which old European people live nowadays: alone, with partner, with others, in a collective household. Nine countries with different social and political contexts are compared by using different data sources. These socio-demographic characteristics play the same role in all countries except for the influence of childlessness and of gender, but the geographical heterogeneity of the living arrangements remains partly unexplained due to currently inadequate comparative data sources for Europe.

Maria-José González, Teresa Jurado-Guerrero, “Remaining Childless in Affluent Economies: A Comparison of France, West Germany, Italy and Spain, 199’-2001”

Maria-José González, Teresa Jurado-Guerrero, “Remaining Childless in Affluent Economies: A Comparison of France, West Germany, Italy and Spain, 199’-2001”, European Journal of Population, 2006, vol. 22, n° 4, pp. 317-352

15This article explores why women delay childbearing and increase their likelihood to remain childless in Spain, Italy, West Germany and France. The authors take a macro-micro perspective and show that national institutions influence women’s life transitions, in particular partnership and motherhood. For coupled women, they find two alternative modes out of childlessness. In countries with high direct and indirect child costs, like Spain and Italy, entering a male-breadwinner couple or occupying a stable and high-income position facilitates motherhood, while in the French context motherhood is most likely in a dual-earner partnership.

José Miguel Guzmán, Jorge Rodriguez, Jorge Martinez, Juan Manuel Contreras, Daniela Gonzalez, « La démographie de l’Amérique latine et de la Caraïbe depuis 1950 »

José Miguel Guzmán, Jorge Rodriguez, Jorge Martinez, Juan Manuel Contreras, Daniela Gonzalez, « La démographie de l’Amérique latine et de la Caraïbe depuis 1950 », Population, 2006, vol. 61, n° 5-6 (septembre-décembre), pp. 623-734

16Consacrée à l’Amérique latine et à la Caraïbe (un peu plus de cinquante États et territoires, 564 millions d’habitants), cette chronique propose à la fois une synthèse des grands changements socio-démographiques et sanitaires depuis les années 1950, et un bilan statistique rassemblant les données des recensements et des grandes enquêtes sur chaque pays. Y sont notamment examinés les effectifs et les structures de la population, la fécondité, la nuptialité, la mortalité, les migrations, l’urbanisation et l’accès à l’éducation. L’Amérique latine et la Caraïbe connaissent depuis plusieurs décennies un processus de transition démographique rapide, imputable à un recul de la mortalité qui a conduit à une hausse moyenne de l’espérance de vie de 20 ans entre 1950 et 2000, pour atteindre 68 ans chez les hommes et 75 ans chez les femmes, et à une baisse de la fécondité à partir du milieu des années 1960. Le rythme de croissance naturelle a fortement diminue (1,4 % en 2000-2004), tandis que le solde migratoire est affecté par une plus forte émigration vers des destinations extra-régionales. Dans un contexte de baisse généralisée de la fécondité (2,6 enfants par femme en 2000-2004), les modèles d’entrée précoce dans la vie familiale persistent. Parmi les régions dites en développement, l’Amérique latine et la Caraïbe présentent le taux d’urbanisation le plus élevé (77 % en 2005). Une autre spécificité des pays de cette région du monde est que leur structure par âge commence à être marquée par les effets du vieillissement qui sont en revanche encore peu apparents dans les pays d’Afrique sub-saharienne et du monde arabe et du Moyen-Orient.

Amani Ishemo, Hugh Semple, Elizabeth Thomas-Hope, “Population Mobility and the Survival of Small Farming in the Rio Grande Valley, Jamaica”

Amani Ishemo, Hugh Semple, Elizabeth Thomas-Hope, “Population Mobility and the Survival of Small Farming in the Rio Grande Valley, Jamaica”, The Geographical Journal, 2006 (December), vol. 172, n° 4, pp. 318-330

17The relationship between population mobility and farming is complex and has been the focus of numerous studies. Despite differing perspectives on the subject, there is an increasing realization that migration sustains farming in many rural communities, but with contradictory effects. Notwithstanding this conclusion, there is a paucity of village level studies that explain the precise ways in which migration in its various forms affects the survival of small farms. This paper reports on the results of a village level study of migration and small farming in the Rio Grande Valley of Jamaica. Apart from highlighting the various ways in which migration affects small farming at the local level, the study confirms the contradictory impact of migration on small farming in the remote agricultural community. It is noted, however, that the net effect is positive and the capital and labour resources, which are made available as a result of migration, play pivotal roles in the survival of small-scale farming as an economic activity in the area.

Aree Jampaklay, “How Does Leaving Home Affect Marital Timing? An Event-History Analysis of Migration and Marriage in Nang Rong, Thailand”

Aree Jampaklay, “How Does Leaving Home Affect Marital Timing? An Event-History Analysis of Migration and Marriage in Nang Rong, Thailand”, Demography, 2006 (November), vol. 43, n° 4, pp. 711-725

18This study examines the effects of migration on marital timing in Thailand between 1984 and 2000 using prospective and retrospective survey data from Nang Rong. In contrast to previous results in the literature, event-history analysis of the longitudinal data reveals a positive, not a negative, effect of lagged migration experience on the likelihood of marriage. The findings also indicate gender differences. Migration’s positive impact is independent of other life events for women but is completely “explained” by employment for men.

Roel Jennissen, Nicole van der Gaag, Leo van Wissen, “Searching for Similar International Migration Trends across Countries in Europe”

Roel Jennissen, Nicole van der Gaag, Leo van Wissen, “Searching for Similar International Migration Trends across Countries in Europe”, Genus, 2006 (April-June), vol. LXII, n° 2, pp. 37-64

19International migration trends in Europe after the Second World War have been discussed extensively in the existing literature. However the majority of these studies has been sheer descriptive. This article aims to support the qualitative description of migration patterns with quantitative data. Therefore, a multivariate analysis on net migration data (period 1960-2002) is conducted. The overall conclusion is that the multivariate analysis on net migration data verifies the qualitative description of international migration patterns in Europe for a considerable part.

Melanie K. Jones, Paul L. Latreille and Peter J. Sloane, “Disability, Gender and the Labour Market in Wales”

Melanie K. Jones, Paul L. Latreille and Peter J. Sloane, “Disability, Gender and the Labour Market in Wales”, Regional Studies, 2006 (November), vol. 40, n° 8, pp. 823-845

20Wales exhibits high rates of disability and inactivity, and a higher incidence of mental health problems than other parts of Britain. Using data from the Welsh Local Labour Force Survey, 2001, the results indicate that the low participation rate of the disabled in Wales is partly attributable to their having fewer qualifications; marginal effects suggest education could be a potent remedy for improving their labour market status. In terms of the pay differential between disabled and non-disabled individuals, it would appear that disabled women in Wales suffer disproportionately to disabled men, only in the case of women in there evidence consistent with the presence of discrimination, but this estimate is relatively small.

Stamatis Kalogirou and Ronan Foley, “Health, Place and Hanly: Modelling Accessibility to Hospitals in Ireland”

Stamatis Kalogirou and Ronan Foley, “Health, Place and Hanly: Modelling Accessibility to Hospitals in Ireland”, Irish Geography, 2006, vol. 39, n° 1, pp. 52-68

21The Irish government is currently engaged in considerations about a proposed reorganisation of acute hospital services. The proposals in the ‘Hanly’ Report recommend the creation of new classifications of Major General and Local Hospitals. This paper looked at how these proposals might affect geographical accessibility to Irish acute hospitals and modelled it within a GIS framework. Spatial data in the form of hospital location and size, road network and demographic distribution of over 65’s were drawn together within the GIS. A weighted accessibility formula was applied to produce a measure of accessibility called a Spatial Accessibility Measure based on travel time, hospital size and population weighting. This measure was then applied to produce three scenarios modelled on: a) the existing configuration of services, b) a spatial roll-out and c) a full roll-out of the proposed changes in the ‘Hanly’ Report. The scenarios identified those parts of the country, which were potentially likely to have increased/decreased accessibility to acute hospital services based on the different scenarios. Residents in the central and western parts of the country were shown to be most vulnerable, while the impacts of full roll-out of Hanly suggests additional potential impacts on some suburban hospitals in the Greater Dublin area. The work provides a valuable and previously underdeveloped set of policy informed spatial outcomes which can be adjusted if or when more beds are introduced into the Irish Health care system in the next five to ten years.

Rianne Mahon, “Of Scalar Hierarchies and Welfare Redesign: Child Care in three Canadian Cities”

Rianne Mahon, “Of Scalar Hierarchies and Welfare Redesign: Child Care in three Canadian Cities”, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 2006, vol. 31, n° 4, pp. 452-466

22Scalar theory has recently come under attack for its emphasis on hierarchy. Yet the notion of scalar hierarchies cannot be abandoned if one wants to understand actually-existing social relations and the governance structures in which they are enmeshed. The conception of hierarchy employed by political economists is also more complex than that suggested by the ‘Russian dolls’ metaphor. A multiplicity of diversely structured, overlapping interscalar hierarchies operate in and across diverse policy fields. While these arrangements clearly influence what happens at the local scale, sufficient room often exists for local actors to modify the effects. The complexity of scalar hierarchies is illustrated through an analysis of the governance of child care provision in Canada. Child care arrangements are becoming integral to social reproduction in post-industrial economies, where women form an increasingly important part of the labor force. This paper focuses on child care in three of Canada’s largest cities, each of which is subject to a distinct provincial regime through which federal contributions are filtered. Yet, these cities are more than ‘puppets on a string’.

Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Chiara Capoferro, “International Migration and Gender in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis”

Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Chiara Capoferro, “International Migration and Gender in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis”, International Migration, 2006, vol. 44, n° 5, pp. 63-91

23The authors review census data to assess the standing of five Latin American nations on a gender continuum ranging from patriarchal to matrifocal. They show that Mexico and Costa Rica lie close to one another with a highly patriarchal system of gender relations whereas Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic are similar in having a matrifocal system. Puerto Rico occupies a middle position, blending characteristics of both systems. These differences yield different patterns of female relative to male migration. Female householders in the two patriarchal settings displayed low rates of out-migration compared with males, whereas in the two matrifocal countries the ratio of female to male migration was much higher, in some case exceeding their male counterparts. Multivariate analyses showed that in patriarchal societies, a formal or informal union with a male dramatically lowers the odds of female out-migration, whereas in matrifocal societies marriage and cohabitation have not real effect. The most important determinants of female migration from patriarchal settings are the migrant status of the husband or partner, having relatives in the United States, and the possession of legal documents. In matrifocal settings, however, female migration is less related to the woman’s own migratory experience. Whereas the process of cumulative causation appears to be driven largely by men in patriarchal societies, it is women who dominate the process in matrifocal settings.

Dominique Meurs, Ariane Pailhé, Patrick Simon, « Persistance des inégalités entre générations liées à l’immigration : l’accès à l’emploi des immigrés et de leurs descendants en France »

Dominique Meurs, Ariane Pailhé, Patrick Simon, « Persistance des inégalités entre générations liées à l’immigration : l’accès à l’emploi des immigrés et de leurs descendants en France », Population, 2006, vol. 61, n° 5-6 (septembre-décembre), pp. 763-802

24Si les travaux sur la mobilité intergénérationnelle sont assez classiques en France, la question des trajectoires sociales suivies par les descendants de migrants est d’apparition relativement récente. À partir des données de l’enquête Étude de l’histoire familiale, couplée au recensement de 1999, cet article analyse l’insertion professionnelle des enfants d’immigrés appréciée par l’accès à l’emploi et les positions occupées sur le marché du travail, en les comparant aux immigrés et aux « natifs ». Si une modification substantielle des formes d’activité est intervenue d’une génération à l’autre, les « seconde génération » connaissent toujours d’importantes difficultés pour entrer dans le marché du travail. À la surexposition au chômage s’ajoutent une plus grande précarité dans l’emploi et une dépendance à l’égard des emplois aidés. En revanche, la forte ségrégation professionnelle qui s’observe pour les immigrés diminue à la génération suivante, signalant un processus de diffusion dans l’espace des professions. La persistance des écarts entre secondes générations et natifs contredit l’hypothèse d’une mobilité entre générations liées à l’immigration résultant de la scolarisation et de la socialisation en France. Ce handicap d’une origine « héritée » témoigne de l’existence de discriminations, qui pèsent principalement sur les trajectoires des immigrés maghrébins, africains et turcs, mais aussi sur celles de leurs descendants.

Letizia Mencaribi, Maria Letizia Tanturri, « Familles nombreuses et couples sans enfant : les déterminants individuels des comportements reproductifs en Italie »

Letizia Mencaribi, Maria Letizia Tanturri, « Familles nombreuses et couples sans enfant : les déterminants individuels des comportements reproductifs en Italie », Population, 2006, vol. 61, n° 4, pp. 463-491

25Les estimations récentes de la fécondité des générations italiennes nées après 1960 révèlent une forte augmentation de la proportion de femmes sans enfant et une proportion élevée de mères ayant un seul enfant. Le groupe de femmes dont la parité est la plus basse (0 ou 1 enfant) est donc désormais plus nombreux que celui des mères de deux enfants. L’objectif de cet article est de dégager le profil des femmes qui n’ont pas reproduit la norme dominante de la famille de deux enfants. L’analyse prend en considération les caractéristiques individuelles de la femme, celles de son conjoint, ainsi que celles du couple durant les premières années de la vie commune. L’article examine les motifs invoqués par les femmes pour expliquer pourquoi elles n’ont pas d’enfant ou pourquoi elles n’en ont pas davantage, et la manière dont elles pourraient réagir à certaines mesures de politique familiale. Cette étude exploite les données d’une enquête réalisée en 2002 dans cinq zones urbaines italiennes. Les résultats montrent que c’est le groupe des femmes sans enfant qui diffère le plus de la catégorie modale des mères de deux enfants. Les facteurs associés à une double fécondité ou à une fécondité qui s’écarte du standard - entre autres, un niveau d’instruction supérieur et l’absence de pratique religieuse – restent pertinents pour caractériser le comportement reproductif des générations féminines nées vers les années 1960. Il semble que le groupe des mères d’un enfant unique soit le plus susceptible de se laisser influencer par certaines mesures de politique familiale.

France Meslé, « Progrès récents de l’espérance de vie en France »

France Meslé : « Progrès récents de l’espérance de vie en France », Population, 2006, vol. 61, n° 4, pp. 437-462

26Quels que soient le sexe et l’âge, l’espérance de vie n’a quasiment pas cessé d’augmenter en France depuis le début des années 1950. À la naissance, les femmes ont ainsi gagné 14,6 ans d’espérance de vie entre 1950 et 2005 et les hommes 13,3 ans. Au cours des deux dernières décennies, l’écart d’espérance de vie entre les sexes s’est stabilisé et a même commencé à se réduire. Cette réduction tient pour l’essentiel à une accélération des progrès masculins, mais un essoufflement des progrès féminins avant 60 ans est également perceptible. Aux âges les plus élevés, en revanche, les progrès se sont poursuivis à un rythme plus rapide pour les femmes que pour les hommes. Bien que la mortalité tumorale soit en baisse aussi bien pour les femmes que pour les hommes, les cancers arrivent désormais au premier rang des causes de décès, devant les maladies cardio-vasculaires pour lesquelles la mortalité a considérablement diminué. Aux grands âges, la surmortalité exceptionnelle due à la canicule de 2003 n’a interrompu que brièvement une évolution très favorable, essentiellement liée au recul de la mortalité cardio-vasculaire. Les progrès à venir dépendront des succès remportés dans la lutte anti-cancéreuse et dans le contrôle des maladies neuro-dégénératives.

Katja Mueller and Michael J. Bradshaw, “Optimirus. Simulating Population Change in the Russian Far East”

Katja Mueller and Michael J. Bradshaw, “Optimirus. Simulating Population Change in the Russian Far East”, European Journal of Demography, 2006, vol. 22, n° 2, pp. 105-125

27This article examines the population trends in the cities of the Russian Far East between the two census years 1989 and 2002. Three geographical models – Rank Size Rule, Temperature per Capita and a simple gravity model – are used to describe the direction of these population trends. An economic efficiency function is constructed from the three models to simulate an ideal population distribution for the Russian Far East. The heart of the simulation is a conjugate gradient optimisation of the economic efficiency function. The results serve as an important backdrop to discussions of current population trends and as basis for recommendations concerning future changes in the spatial distribution of population in the region.

Sarah-Anne Munoz, “Divided by Faith – The Impact of Religious Affiliation on Ethnic Segregation”

Sarah-Anne Munoz, “Divided by Faith – The Impact of Religious Affiliation on Ethnic Segregation”, Scottish Geographical Magazine, 2006 (June), vol. 122, n° 2, pp. 85-99

28This paper re-examines a theme that has long permeated human geography research – that of ethnic minority segregation. However, this re-examination is carried out with an awereness of the internal religious composition of ethnic populations. The paper contends that religion is an important factor that needs to be considered in any understanding of ethnic segregation. This argument is supported by an investigation of Indian and Pakistani residential segregation in the Scottish cities of Dundee and Glasgow. This investigation assesses whether Indian residents of different faiths (Hindu, Muslim and Sikh) have divergent experiences of segregation. The concept of segregation is further explored by using the P* segregation index alongside the Index of Dissimilarity (ID). This highlights the everyday realities of segregated ethnic-faith group geographies in terms of neighbourhood interaction and thus investigates the degree to which ethnic-faith groups are segregated from each other as well as from the overall population.

Michael Murphy, Pekka Martikainen and Sophie Pennec, “Demographic Change and the Supply of Potential Family Supporters”

Michael Murphy, Pekka Martikainen and Sophie Pennec, “Demographic Change and the Supply of Potential Family Supporters”, European Journal of Population, 2006, vol. 22, n° 3, pp. 219-240

29The authors consider the distribution of changes in mortality and fertility to availability of living mothers and living children among older people in Britain, Finland and France. The proportion of people aged around 60 with a mother alive will more than double between those born in 1911 and 1970 before starting to decline slightly. Conversely, a higher proportion of elderly people are likely to have a surviving child than for any generation ever born in all three countries in the next quarter century or so, with about 85% of 80-year old women having at least one surviving child, and about two-thirds having two or more.

Jan Nijman, “Locals, Exiles and Cosmopolitans: A Theoretical Argument about Identity and Place in Miami”

Jan Nijman, ” “Locals, Exiles and Cosmopolitans: A Theoretical Argument about Identity and Place in Miami”, Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, 2007, vol. 98, n° 2, pp. 176-187

30Recent theoretical advances point to the dynamic and plural nature of processes of identity formation. Moreover, the ascendance of the globalisation paradigm implies a greater emphasis on their geographical dimension in terms of place and mobility. Illustrated with the case of Miami, this paper presents a theoretical argument about place, mobility and identity in contemporary global cities. The need to go beyond conventional and singular categories of identity is argued, with special reference to the impact of rapid increases in spatial mobility. In this paper, the role of Miami’s different populations is framed in the context of their geographical identities and the ways they identify with Miami as locals, exiles and cosmopolitans. The high mobility of Miami’s population and the small number of locals pose some major challenges, with implications for this city’s civil society. The case of Miami also sheds a different, and less idealistic, light on the meaning of cosmopolitanism.

Alberto Palloni, “Reproducing Inequalities: Luck, Wallets, and the Enduring Effects of Childhood Health”

Alberto Palloni, “Reproducing Inequalities: Luck, Wallets, and the Enduring Effects of Childhood Health”, Demography, 2006 (November), vol. 43, n° 4, pp. 587-641

31In this article, the author argues that research on social stratification, on intergenerational transmission of inequalities, and on the theory of factor payments and wage determination will be strengthened by studying the role played by early childhood health. He shows that the inclusion of such a factor requires researchers to integrate theories in each of these fields with new theories linking early childhood health conditions and events that occur at later stages in the life course of individuals, particularly physical and mental health as well as disability and mortality. The empirical evidence the author gathers shows that early childhood health matters for the achievement of, or social accession to, adult social class positions. Even if the magnitude of associations is not overwhelming, it is not weaker than that found between adult social accession and other, more conventional and better-studied individual characteristics such as educational attainment. It is very likely that the evidence presented in this article grossly underplays the importance of early childhood health for adult socio-economic achievement.

Olivier Pliez, « Nomades d’hier, nomades d’aujourd’hui. Les migrants africains réactivent-ils les territoires nomades au Sahara ? »

Olivier Pliez, « Nomades d’hier, nomades d’aujourd’hui. Les migrants africains réactivent-ils les territoires nomades au Sahara ? », Annales de Géographie, 2006 (novembre-décembre), 115ème année, n° 652, pp. 688-707

32Les migrants africains qui, via le Sahara, migrent vers le Maghreb et l’Europe depuis les années 1990 ne réactivent pas les routes caravanières d’antan. Ces mouvements s’inscrivent en effet dans la continuité des flux migratoires depuis le Sahel vers la Libye qui sont à la fois plus anciens et plus importants au plan numérique, et qui demeurent pourtant peu connus. Dissocier ces deux mouvements permet de mieux comprendre comment les migrations transsahariennes contemporaines ont rapidement pu prendre une telle ampleur. À partir d’un vaste espace à cheval entre Libye, Tchad et Soudan, l’auteur tente de comprendre comment les nomades d’hier et ceux d’aujourd’hui vivent dans des villes créées par les États où se redéfinissent fonctions urbaines et identités citadines produites par le mouvement. C’est toute la géographie d’un Sahara cloisonné qui est remise en cause par ces nouvelles circulations et celle d’un Sahara en réseau qu’il devient alors possible de mettre en lumière.

Samuel H. Preston and Haidong Wang, “Sex Mortality Differences in the United States: The Role of Cohort Smoking Patterns”

Samuel H. Preston and Haidong Wang, “Sex Mortality Differences in the United States: The Role of Cohort Smoking Patterns”, Demography, 2006 (November),vol. 43, n° 4, pp. 631-646

33This article demonstrates that over the period 1948-2003, sex differences in mortality in the age range 50-84 widened and then narrowed on a cohort basis rather than on a period basis. The cohort with the maximum excess of male mortality was born shortly after the turn of the century. Three separate data sources suggest that the turnaround in sex mortality differences is consistent with sex differences in cigarette smoking by cohort. An age-period-cohort model reveals a highly significant effect of smoking histories on men’s and women’s mortality. Combined with recent changes in smoking patterns, the model suggests that sex differences in mortality will narrow dramatically in coming decades.

France Prioux, « L’évolution démographique récente en France »

France Prioux, « L’évolution démographique récente en France », Population, 2006, vol. 61, n° 4, pp. 393-435

34La France métropolitaine compte 60 millions d’habitants au 1er janvier 2006. La population s’est accrue au taux de 5,6 ‰ en 2005, dont près des trois quarts en raison du solde naturel. Depuis 2004, l’immigration en provenance des pays tiers n’augmente plus. L’indicateur conjoncturel de fécondité s’établit à 1,92 enfant par femme, au deuxième rang en Europe derrière l’Irlande. L’augmentation de l’immigration n’a contribué que pour un tiers au relèvement de la fécondité en France depuis 1997. Au niveau départemental, il n’y a pas de relation entre évolutions de la présence étrangère et de la fécondité. Malgré ce redressement de la fécondité annuelle, la descendance finale des générations nées après 1960 diminue et se rapproche progressivement de 2 enfants par femme. Alors que le nombre de Pacs a progressé de 50 % en 2005, le nombre de mariages est resté stable. En 2003 et 2004, les divorces ont recommencé à augmenter, et l’indicateur conjoncturel de divortialité est maintenant proche de 45 %. La forte baisse de la mortalité est confirmée en 2005, avec une espérance de vie à la naissance de 76,8 ans pour les hommes et de 83,8 ans pour les femmes. En 2004, la chute de la mortalité est particulièrement forte pour les femmes de plus de 65 ans. Depuis 1990, la surmortalité masculine s’est un peu réduite entre 15 et 70 ans, mais au-delà de 70 ans, les progrès ont été plus importants pour les femmes. C’est autour de 45 ans que les progrès sont les plus faibles, en particulier pour les femmes entre 40 et 55 ans.

Patrick Rérat, « Mutations urbaines, mutations démographiques. Contribution à l’explication de la déprise démographique des villes-centres »

Patrick Rérat, « Mutations urbaines, mutations démographiques. Contribution à l’explication de la déprise démographique des villes-centres », Revue d’Économie Régionale et Urbaine, 2006, n° 5, pp. 725-750

35Les nouvelles modalités de l’urbanisation ont notamment provoqué un phénomène d’étalement et de déconcentration du peuplement à l’échelle intra-urbaine. Entre 1970 et 2000, la ville de Neuchâtel a perdu près de 6000 habitants. En étudiant les ménages, il est possible de préciser la nature de cette déprise démographique. Le fait que la ville compte parallèlement près de 2000 ménages supplémentaires amène les auteurs à rejeter les hypothèses relatives à la destruction de logements, à la reconversion d’appartements vers d’autres affectations ou à une attractivité déficiente (dont témoignerait un taux de vacance substantiel). L’apparente contradiction entre une diminution de la population et une augmentation du nombre de ménages s’explique par la réduction de la taille moyenne de ces derniers. Ainsi, malgré une densification du tissu bâti par la construction de logements, on assiste à une densification du point de vue de la population.

Stéphane Rosière, « La géographie face au nettoyage ethnique – vers une géographie inhumaine »

Stéphane Rosière, « La géographie face au nettoyage ethnique – vers une géographie inhumaine », Bulletin de l’Association de Géographes Français, 2006, 83ème année, n° 4, pp. 448-460

36Cet article répond à un double objectif : expliquer pourquoi les phénomènes du type nettoyage ethnique sont longtemps restés en dehors des réflexions des géographes, et souligner l’impact des politiques d’homogénéisation menées par les États. Depuis Pierre George dans les années cinquante, la géographie humaine et la géographie de la population expliquent la répartition des peuples en fonction de facteurs naturels, économiques et historiques. Cette dernière catégorie ne paraît pourtant pas opératoire et devrait être remplacée par les facteurs politiques qui mettraient en exergue le rôle des États et l’effet de leurs politiques d’homogénéisation. L’homogénéité ethnique apparaît en effet comme le meilleur garant de la légitimité et de la sécurité des États-nations. Celle-ci est recherchée de deux façons, soit en développant des in-politics (assimilation forcée), soit des ex-politics (expulsion ou extermination). Ces politiques impliquent une violence graduelle qui va de mesures de rétorsion culturelle jusqu’au génocide. Parmi les ex-politics, le « nettoyage » s’impose comme une pratique de masse puisque, en un siècle près de 100 millions d’individus ont eu à en subir les conséquences.

Michel Roux, « La géographie de la population et le nettoyage ethnique en ex-Yougoslavie »

Michel Roux, « La géographie de la population et le nettoyage ethnique en ex-Yougoslavie », Bulletin de l’Association de Géographes Français, 2006, 83ème année, n° 4, pp. 399-408

37Cet article propose une typologie du nettoyage ethnique, souligne la difficulté d’en cerner tous les aspects, puis envisage son impact sur le peuplement des territoires concernés : nombre d’habitants, composition ethnique, natalité, mortalité, structure par âges, répartition entre villes et campagnes, perspectives migratoires. Les exemples sont pris en Croatie, en Bosnie-Herzégovine et au Kosovo.

Reto Schumacher, Thomas Spoorenberg et Yannic Forney, « Déstandardisation, différenciation régionale et changements générationnels. Départ du foyer parental et modes de vie en Suisse au xxe siècle »

Reto Schumacher, Thomas Spoorenberg et Yannic Forney, « Déstandardisation, différenciation régionale et changements générationnels. Départ du foyer parental et modes de vie en Suisse au xxe siècle », European Journal of Demography, 2006, vol. 22, n° 2, pp. 153-177

38Le choix du mode de vie au départ du domicile parental est une question peu abordée dans les études sur le passage à la vie adulte. Cet article propose une analyse des comportements en matière de mode de vie au départ du foyer parental et leur évolution en Suisse au cours du 20ème siècle. À partir des données de l’enquête biographique du Panel Suisse des Ménages, des analyses longitudinales sont menées sur le calendrier de départ du foyer parental, puis, en spécifiant des modèles à risques concurrentiels, sur le type de mode de vie choisi à ce moment. Les résultats montrent qu’en Suisse ces comportements varient selon les cohortes et les régions tant du point de vue du calendrier de départ, du type de destination choisi que dans la synchronisation des principaux événements du passage à la vie adulte.

Zhongmin Wu, Shujie Yao, “On Unemployment Inflow and Outflow in Urban China”

Zhongmin Wu, Shujie Yao, “On Unemployment Inflow and Outflow in Urban China”, Regional Studies, 2006 (November), vol. 40, n° 8, pp. 811-822

39As the largest transitional economy in the world, China’s labour market has a number of characteristics distinctively different from that of the developed economies such as the UK or the USA. This paper aims to identify the determinants of unemployment inflow and outflow in urban China. With empirical data for 29 provinces over 1989-1999, it is found that rural-urban migration, ownership diversification, industrial structural change, international trade, international competitiveness, product wages, and age structure are key determinants of unemployment flows. The results suggest that due to market imperfections, unemployment inflow and outflow are two asymmetric processes with respect to the concerned predetermined variables.

David W. Smith and Benjamin S. Bradshaw, “Variation in Life Expectancy During the Twentieth Century in the United States”

David W. Smith and Benjamin S. Bradshaw, “Variation in Life Expectancy During the Twentieth Century in the United States”, Demography, 2006 (November), vol. 43, n° 4, pp. 647-657

40The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reports life expectancy at birth (LE) for each year in the United States. Censal year estimates of LE use complete life tables. From 1900 through 1947, LEs for intercensal years were interpolated from decennial life tables. A substantial drop in variation in LE occured in the 1940s. To evaluate these methods and examine variation without artifacts of different methods, the authors estimated a consistent series of both annual abridged life tables and LEs from official NCHS age-specific death rates and also LEs using the interpolation method for 1900-1998. Interpolated LEs are several times as variable as life tables estimates, about 2 times as variable before 1940 and about 6.5 times as variable after 1950. Estimates of LE from annual life tables are better measures than those based on the mixed methods detailed in NCHS reports. Estimates from life tables show that the impact of the 1918 influenza pandemic on LE was much smaller than indicated by official statistics. The authors conclude that NCHS should report official estimates of intercensal LE for 1900-1948 computed from life tables in place of the existing LEs that were computed by interpolation.

Bénédicte Tratnjek, « Le nettoyage ethnique à Mitrovica : interprétation géographique d’un double déplacement forcé »

Bénédicte Tratnjek, « Le nettoyage ethnique à Mitrovica : interprétation géographique d’un double déplacement forcé », Bulletin de l’Association de Géographes Français, 2006, 83ème année, n° 4, pp. 433-447

41La province du Kosovo aujourd’hui paraît très éloignée de l’idéal titiste de Jedintsvo, Bratstvo (« Unité, Fraternité ») ; elle est au contraire le théâtre d’un contrôle territorial. Les effets du nettoyage ethnique, dont le but est de modifier de façon violente le peuplement d’un territoire-cible (Rosière, 2005) sont particulièrement lisibles dans la ville de Mitrovica. Ainsi, l’espace « réel » de la ville est désormais coupé en deux secteurs qui tendent à l’homogénéité ethnique, tandis que « l’espace vécu » reflète les rancœurs entre les communautés. La répartition des communautés dans la ville de Mitrovica résulte de deux processus symétriques de déplacements forcés produits par le nettoyage ethnique. Tout d’abord, celui que menèrent les Serbes contre les Albanais, qui engendra l’intervention militaire de l’OTAN contre la Serbie en 1999 ; puis le nettoyage ethnique « oublié » des Serbes et des petites minorités par les Albanais après l’arrivée des troupes de l’OTAN. La situation actuelle est le résultat de ces violents affrontements intercommunautaires pour l’hégémonie territoriale dans lesquels le nettoyage ethnique semble le moyen le plus efficace pour parvenir à un contrôle spatial irréversible.

Zhongmin Wu, Shujie Yao, “On Unemployment Inflow and Outflow in Urban China”

Zhongmin Wu, Shujie Yao, “On Unemployment Inflow and Outflow in Urban China”, Regional Studies, 2006 (November), vol. 40, n° 8, pp. 811-822

42As the largest transitional economy in the world, China’s labour market has a number of characteristics distinctively different from that of the developed economies such as the UK or the USA. This paper aims to identify the determinants of unemployment inflow and outflow in urban China. With empirical data for 29 provinces over 1989-1999, it is found that rural-urban migration, ownership diversification, industrial structural change, international trade, international competitiveness, product wages, and age structure are key determinants of unemployment flows. The results suggest that due to market imperfections, unemployment inflow and outflow are two asymmetric processes with respect to the concerned predetermined variables.

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

« Comptes rendus d'articles », Espace populations sociétés, 2007/1 | 2007, 137-149.

Référence électronique

« Comptes rendus d'articles », Espace populations sociétés [En ligne], 2007/1 | 2007, mis en ligne le 30 août 2009, consulté le 28 juin 2017. URL : http://eps.revues.org/2064 ; DOI : 10.4000/eps.2064

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Licence Creative Commons
Espace Populations Sociétés est mis à disposition selon les termes de la licence Creative Commons Attribution - Pas d'Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 4.0 International.

Haut de page
  • Logo Université de Lille 1 - Sciences et technologies
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Revues.org